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Werewolf in Napa: How the Moon Affects Wine

Werewolf in Napa: How the Moon Affects Wine


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Photo by Arjan Almekinders

by Madeline Blasberg

It tugs at the tide, boosts plant growth, and helps put us to sleep, but can it really influence the way we taste wine? For centuries, mystics have turned to the moon to guide them. Its phases have served as a reference point for sailors, doctors, farmers, and now… wine lovers?

Spend a few days around wine industry insiders and you’re sure to hear the word biodynamic tossed around in conversation. Though the word rings of scientific study, it’s really more of a blend between agriculture and astrology. Biodynamics provide “a unified approach to agriculture that relates the ecology of the earth-organism to that of the entire cosmos,” according to the Association of Biodynamic Farming and Gardening. But what does that mean to us? It means we should look to the moon.

Biodynamic practices are based on the belief that the best wines are produced when vineyard tasks – planting, pruning, harvesting etc. – coincide with specific dates of the lunar calendar. And though these practices have long since been used to govern the production of wine, there are some biodynamic believers who insist that the moon also impacts how a wine tastes. After all, the moon affects the world’s oceans, plant growth, and even our bodies… why should a bottle of wine be any exception?

Photo by Daniel Spiess

Maria Thun, biodynamic researcher and full-on believer, created her first biodynamic calendar in the 1950s, which was used to direct farmers to the best time to plant their crops. More recently, she created When Wine Tastes Best 2014: A Biodynamic Calendar for Wine Drinkers, which was released on November 1, 2013.

According to her wine drinking guide, and the school of mystic science behind it, the year is broken down into four types of days: fruit, flower, leaf, and root days. Not every day is created equal, certainly not when it comes time to fill up your wine glass. The key to deciphering a biodynamic calendar is knowing the characteristics of each day:

Fruit days are ideal days to uncork a bottle of wine. Wines tend to express ripe, full fruit notes and appear full-bodied and rich in the mouth.

Flower days are generally considered neutral. They bring out aromatic floral notes particularly in white wines, and are the second-most auspicious days for wine drinking.

Leaf days tend to emphasize a wine’s earthiness and minerality, so much so that the wine is thrown into imbalance.

Root days can derail a wine tasting altogether. Wines tend to be closed, unexpressive, and flat, as though someone had turn downed the volume of the wine tasting experience.

Madeline Blasberg is a Certified Wine Consultant currently working for Etching Expressions as Official Wine Commentator & Reviewer. She has spent time living in Mendoza, Argentina where she was surrounded by wine, both personally and professionally.

"Werewolf in Napa: How the Moon Affects Wine" originally published on The Menuism Dining Blog.


Forget Cavemen, Now Everyone's Eating Like a Werewolf

Just when I thought I have heard it all, another diet appears on my radar. This time it&aposs the werewolf diet, also know as the lunar diet. And of course it has become popular because supposedly there are celebrities who are following it, including Demi Moore and Madonna.

This is the deal: There are actually two diet plans for those wishing to lose weight. The first one is called the basic moon diet plan, and it consists of a 24-hour fasting period in which only liquids, such as water and juice, are consumed. According to Moon Connection, a website advocating this diet, the moon affects the water in your body, therefore the timing of your fast is very important and must occur exactly-at the very second-when the new moon or full moon occurs. Also per this site, you could lose up to 6 pounds in one 24-hour period. Since you would only be fasting once a month, really no harm done. You would lose water weight but then probably gain it back immediately. [Tweet this fact!]

The second diet plan is the extended moon diet plan. In this version, all phases of the moon are covered: full moon, waning moon, waxing moon, and new moon. During the full and new moon phase, 24-hour fasting is encouraged same as the basic plan. During the waning moon period, one can consume solid foods, but with around eight glasses of water a day to "encourage detoxification." Then during the waxing moon, you eat "less than usual" without starving yourself and are advised not to eat after 6 p.m., when "the moon&aposs light becomes more visible." With this plan you would be fasting more and therefore putting yourself at risk for side effects such as fatigue, irritability, and dizziness, in addition to impinging greatly on your social life. (Not eating after 6? I don&apost think that would work for most.)

I have many problems with this diet, but the main issue is there is no conclusive scientific evidence that supports the claim that our bodies need a detox program or cleanse. We have kidneys, which naturally remove waste from our bodies 24 hours a day, 7 days a week without the need for a liquid fast. And furthermore, I couldn&apost find any research to support the relationship between the lunar calendar and our body water.

To me, this is just another fad diet that restricts calories. Any weight loss would most likely be temporary due to difficulty sticking with this plan, as well as the fact that any pounds lost are likely water weight, which is quickly regained when you return to normal eating. Let&aposs leave this diet to the celebrities-or better yet, the werewolfs. The rest of should know better.

What do you think of the Werewolf Diet? Tweet us @Shape_Magazine and @kerigans.


Forget Cavemen, Now Everyone's Eating Like a Werewolf

Just when I thought I have heard it all, another diet appears on my radar. This time it&aposs the werewolf diet, also know as the lunar diet. And of course it has become popular because supposedly there are celebrities who are following it, including Demi Moore and Madonna.

This is the deal: There are actually two diet plans for those wishing to lose weight. The first one is called the basic moon diet plan, and it consists of a 24-hour fasting period in which only liquids, such as water and juice, are consumed. According to Moon Connection, a website advocating this diet, the moon affects the water in your body, therefore the timing of your fast is very important and must occur exactly-at the very second-when the new moon or full moon occurs. Also per this site, you could lose up to 6 pounds in one 24-hour period. Since you would only be fasting once a month, really no harm done. You would lose water weight but then probably gain it back immediately. [Tweet this fact!]

The second diet plan is the extended moon diet plan. In this version, all phases of the moon are covered: full moon, waning moon, waxing moon, and new moon. During the full and new moon phase, 24-hour fasting is encouraged same as the basic plan. During the waning moon period, one can consume solid foods, but with around eight glasses of water a day to "encourage detoxification." Then during the waxing moon, you eat "less than usual" without starving yourself and are advised not to eat after 6 p.m., when "the moon&aposs light becomes more visible." With this plan you would be fasting more and therefore putting yourself at risk for side effects such as fatigue, irritability, and dizziness, in addition to impinging greatly on your social life. (Not eating after 6? I don&apost think that would work for most.)

I have many problems with this diet, but the main issue is there is no conclusive scientific evidence that supports the claim that our bodies need a detox program or cleanse. We have kidneys, which naturally remove waste from our bodies 24 hours a day, 7 days a week without the need for a liquid fast. And furthermore, I couldn&apost find any research to support the relationship between the lunar calendar and our body water.

To me, this is just another fad diet that restricts calories. Any weight loss would most likely be temporary due to difficulty sticking with this plan, as well as the fact that any pounds lost are likely water weight, which is quickly regained when you return to normal eating. Let&aposs leave this diet to the celebrities-or better yet, the werewolfs. The rest of should know better.

What do you think of the Werewolf Diet? Tweet us @Shape_Magazine and @kerigans.


Forget Cavemen, Now Everyone's Eating Like a Werewolf

Just when I thought I have heard it all, another diet appears on my radar. This time it&aposs the werewolf diet, also know as the lunar diet. And of course it has become popular because supposedly there are celebrities who are following it, including Demi Moore and Madonna.

This is the deal: There are actually two diet plans for those wishing to lose weight. The first one is called the basic moon diet plan, and it consists of a 24-hour fasting period in which only liquids, such as water and juice, are consumed. According to Moon Connection, a website advocating this diet, the moon affects the water in your body, therefore the timing of your fast is very important and must occur exactly-at the very second-when the new moon or full moon occurs. Also per this site, you could lose up to 6 pounds in one 24-hour period. Since you would only be fasting once a month, really no harm done. You would lose water weight but then probably gain it back immediately. [Tweet this fact!]

The second diet plan is the extended moon diet plan. In this version, all phases of the moon are covered: full moon, waning moon, waxing moon, and new moon. During the full and new moon phase, 24-hour fasting is encouraged same as the basic plan. During the waning moon period, one can consume solid foods, but with around eight glasses of water a day to "encourage detoxification." Then during the waxing moon, you eat "less than usual" without starving yourself and are advised not to eat after 6 p.m., when "the moon&aposs light becomes more visible." With this plan you would be fasting more and therefore putting yourself at risk for side effects such as fatigue, irritability, and dizziness, in addition to impinging greatly on your social life. (Not eating after 6? I don&apost think that would work for most.)

I have many problems with this diet, but the main issue is there is no conclusive scientific evidence that supports the claim that our bodies need a detox program or cleanse. We have kidneys, which naturally remove waste from our bodies 24 hours a day, 7 days a week without the need for a liquid fast. And furthermore, I couldn&apost find any research to support the relationship between the lunar calendar and our body water.

To me, this is just another fad diet that restricts calories. Any weight loss would most likely be temporary due to difficulty sticking with this plan, as well as the fact that any pounds lost are likely water weight, which is quickly regained when you return to normal eating. Let&aposs leave this diet to the celebrities-or better yet, the werewolfs. The rest of should know better.

What do you think of the Werewolf Diet? Tweet us @Shape_Magazine and @kerigans.


Forget Cavemen, Now Everyone's Eating Like a Werewolf

Just when I thought I have heard it all, another diet appears on my radar. This time it&aposs the werewolf diet, also know as the lunar diet. And of course it has become popular because supposedly there are celebrities who are following it, including Demi Moore and Madonna.

This is the deal: There are actually two diet plans for those wishing to lose weight. The first one is called the basic moon diet plan, and it consists of a 24-hour fasting period in which only liquids, such as water and juice, are consumed. According to Moon Connection, a website advocating this diet, the moon affects the water in your body, therefore the timing of your fast is very important and must occur exactly-at the very second-when the new moon or full moon occurs. Also per this site, you could lose up to 6 pounds in one 24-hour period. Since you would only be fasting once a month, really no harm done. You would lose water weight but then probably gain it back immediately. [Tweet this fact!]

The second diet plan is the extended moon diet plan. In this version, all phases of the moon are covered: full moon, waning moon, waxing moon, and new moon. During the full and new moon phase, 24-hour fasting is encouraged same as the basic plan. During the waning moon period, one can consume solid foods, but with around eight glasses of water a day to "encourage detoxification." Then during the waxing moon, you eat "less than usual" without starving yourself and are advised not to eat after 6 p.m., when "the moon&aposs light becomes more visible." With this plan you would be fasting more and therefore putting yourself at risk for side effects such as fatigue, irritability, and dizziness, in addition to impinging greatly on your social life. (Not eating after 6? I don&apost think that would work for most.)

I have many problems with this diet, but the main issue is there is no conclusive scientific evidence that supports the claim that our bodies need a detox program or cleanse. We have kidneys, which naturally remove waste from our bodies 24 hours a day, 7 days a week without the need for a liquid fast. And furthermore, I couldn&apost find any research to support the relationship between the lunar calendar and our body water.

To me, this is just another fad diet that restricts calories. Any weight loss would most likely be temporary due to difficulty sticking with this plan, as well as the fact that any pounds lost are likely water weight, which is quickly regained when you return to normal eating. Let&aposs leave this diet to the celebrities-or better yet, the werewolfs. The rest of should know better.

What do you think of the Werewolf Diet? Tweet us @Shape_Magazine and @kerigans.


Forget Cavemen, Now Everyone's Eating Like a Werewolf

Just when I thought I have heard it all, another diet appears on my radar. This time it&aposs the werewolf diet, also know as the lunar diet. And of course it has become popular because supposedly there are celebrities who are following it, including Demi Moore and Madonna.

This is the deal: There are actually two diet plans for those wishing to lose weight. The first one is called the basic moon diet plan, and it consists of a 24-hour fasting period in which only liquids, such as water and juice, are consumed. According to Moon Connection, a website advocating this diet, the moon affects the water in your body, therefore the timing of your fast is very important and must occur exactly-at the very second-when the new moon or full moon occurs. Also per this site, you could lose up to 6 pounds in one 24-hour period. Since you would only be fasting once a month, really no harm done. You would lose water weight but then probably gain it back immediately. [Tweet this fact!]

The second diet plan is the extended moon diet plan. In this version, all phases of the moon are covered: full moon, waning moon, waxing moon, and new moon. During the full and new moon phase, 24-hour fasting is encouraged same as the basic plan. During the waning moon period, one can consume solid foods, but with around eight glasses of water a day to "encourage detoxification." Then during the waxing moon, you eat "less than usual" without starving yourself and are advised not to eat after 6 p.m., when "the moon&aposs light becomes more visible." With this plan you would be fasting more and therefore putting yourself at risk for side effects such as fatigue, irritability, and dizziness, in addition to impinging greatly on your social life. (Not eating after 6? I don&apost think that would work for most.)

I have many problems with this diet, but the main issue is there is no conclusive scientific evidence that supports the claim that our bodies need a detox program or cleanse. We have kidneys, which naturally remove waste from our bodies 24 hours a day, 7 days a week without the need for a liquid fast. And furthermore, I couldn&apost find any research to support the relationship between the lunar calendar and our body water.

To me, this is just another fad diet that restricts calories. Any weight loss would most likely be temporary due to difficulty sticking with this plan, as well as the fact that any pounds lost are likely water weight, which is quickly regained when you return to normal eating. Let&aposs leave this diet to the celebrities-or better yet, the werewolfs. The rest of should know better.

What do you think of the Werewolf Diet? Tweet us @Shape_Magazine and @kerigans.


Forget Cavemen, Now Everyone's Eating Like a Werewolf

Just when I thought I have heard it all, another diet appears on my radar. This time it&aposs the werewolf diet, also know as the lunar diet. And of course it has become popular because supposedly there are celebrities who are following it, including Demi Moore and Madonna.

This is the deal: There are actually two diet plans for those wishing to lose weight. The first one is called the basic moon diet plan, and it consists of a 24-hour fasting period in which only liquids, such as water and juice, are consumed. According to Moon Connection, a website advocating this diet, the moon affects the water in your body, therefore the timing of your fast is very important and must occur exactly-at the very second-when the new moon or full moon occurs. Also per this site, you could lose up to 6 pounds in one 24-hour period. Since you would only be fasting once a month, really no harm done. You would lose water weight but then probably gain it back immediately. [Tweet this fact!]

The second diet plan is the extended moon diet plan. In this version, all phases of the moon are covered: full moon, waning moon, waxing moon, and new moon. During the full and new moon phase, 24-hour fasting is encouraged same as the basic plan. During the waning moon period, one can consume solid foods, but with around eight glasses of water a day to "encourage detoxification." Then during the waxing moon, you eat "less than usual" without starving yourself and are advised not to eat after 6 p.m., when "the moon&aposs light becomes more visible." With this plan you would be fasting more and therefore putting yourself at risk for side effects such as fatigue, irritability, and dizziness, in addition to impinging greatly on your social life. (Not eating after 6? I don&apost think that would work for most.)

I have many problems with this diet, but the main issue is there is no conclusive scientific evidence that supports the claim that our bodies need a detox program or cleanse. We have kidneys, which naturally remove waste from our bodies 24 hours a day, 7 days a week without the need for a liquid fast. And furthermore, I couldn&apost find any research to support the relationship between the lunar calendar and our body water.

To me, this is just another fad diet that restricts calories. Any weight loss would most likely be temporary due to difficulty sticking with this plan, as well as the fact that any pounds lost are likely water weight, which is quickly regained when you return to normal eating. Let&aposs leave this diet to the celebrities-or better yet, the werewolfs. The rest of should know better.

What do you think of the Werewolf Diet? Tweet us @Shape_Magazine and @kerigans.


Forget Cavemen, Now Everyone's Eating Like a Werewolf

Just when I thought I have heard it all, another diet appears on my radar. This time it&aposs the werewolf diet, also know as the lunar diet. And of course it has become popular because supposedly there are celebrities who are following it, including Demi Moore and Madonna.

This is the deal: There are actually two diet plans for those wishing to lose weight. The first one is called the basic moon diet plan, and it consists of a 24-hour fasting period in which only liquids, such as water and juice, are consumed. According to Moon Connection, a website advocating this diet, the moon affects the water in your body, therefore the timing of your fast is very important and must occur exactly-at the very second-when the new moon or full moon occurs. Also per this site, you could lose up to 6 pounds in one 24-hour period. Since you would only be fasting once a month, really no harm done. You would lose water weight but then probably gain it back immediately. [Tweet this fact!]

The second diet plan is the extended moon diet plan. In this version, all phases of the moon are covered: full moon, waning moon, waxing moon, and new moon. During the full and new moon phase, 24-hour fasting is encouraged same as the basic plan. During the waning moon period, one can consume solid foods, but with around eight glasses of water a day to "encourage detoxification." Then during the waxing moon, you eat "less than usual" without starving yourself and are advised not to eat after 6 p.m., when "the moon&aposs light becomes more visible." With this plan you would be fasting more and therefore putting yourself at risk for side effects such as fatigue, irritability, and dizziness, in addition to impinging greatly on your social life. (Not eating after 6? I don&apost think that would work for most.)

I have many problems with this diet, but the main issue is there is no conclusive scientific evidence that supports the claim that our bodies need a detox program or cleanse. We have kidneys, which naturally remove waste from our bodies 24 hours a day, 7 days a week without the need for a liquid fast. And furthermore, I couldn&apost find any research to support the relationship between the lunar calendar and our body water.

To me, this is just another fad diet that restricts calories. Any weight loss would most likely be temporary due to difficulty sticking with this plan, as well as the fact that any pounds lost are likely water weight, which is quickly regained when you return to normal eating. Let&aposs leave this diet to the celebrities-or better yet, the werewolfs. The rest of should know better.

What do you think of the Werewolf Diet? Tweet us @Shape_Magazine and @kerigans.


Forget Cavemen, Now Everyone's Eating Like a Werewolf

Just when I thought I have heard it all, another diet appears on my radar. This time it&aposs the werewolf diet, also know as the lunar diet. And of course it has become popular because supposedly there are celebrities who are following it, including Demi Moore and Madonna.

This is the deal: There are actually two diet plans for those wishing to lose weight. The first one is called the basic moon diet plan, and it consists of a 24-hour fasting period in which only liquids, such as water and juice, are consumed. According to Moon Connection, a website advocating this diet, the moon affects the water in your body, therefore the timing of your fast is very important and must occur exactly-at the very second-when the new moon or full moon occurs. Also per this site, you could lose up to 6 pounds in one 24-hour period. Since you would only be fasting once a month, really no harm done. You would lose water weight but then probably gain it back immediately. [Tweet this fact!]

The second diet plan is the extended moon diet plan. In this version, all phases of the moon are covered: full moon, waning moon, waxing moon, and new moon. During the full and new moon phase, 24-hour fasting is encouraged same as the basic plan. During the waning moon period, one can consume solid foods, but with around eight glasses of water a day to "encourage detoxification." Then during the waxing moon, you eat "less than usual" without starving yourself and are advised not to eat after 6 p.m., when "the moon&aposs light becomes more visible." With this plan you would be fasting more and therefore putting yourself at risk for side effects such as fatigue, irritability, and dizziness, in addition to impinging greatly on your social life. (Not eating after 6? I don&apost think that would work for most.)

I have many problems with this diet, but the main issue is there is no conclusive scientific evidence that supports the claim that our bodies need a detox program or cleanse. We have kidneys, which naturally remove waste from our bodies 24 hours a day, 7 days a week without the need for a liquid fast. And furthermore, I couldn&apost find any research to support the relationship between the lunar calendar and our body water.

To me, this is just another fad diet that restricts calories. Any weight loss would most likely be temporary due to difficulty sticking with this plan, as well as the fact that any pounds lost are likely water weight, which is quickly regained when you return to normal eating. Let&aposs leave this diet to the celebrities-or better yet, the werewolfs. The rest of should know better.

What do you think of the Werewolf Diet? Tweet us @Shape_Magazine and @kerigans.


Forget Cavemen, Now Everyone's Eating Like a Werewolf

Just when I thought I have heard it all, another diet appears on my radar. This time it&aposs the werewolf diet, also know as the lunar diet. And of course it has become popular because supposedly there are celebrities who are following it, including Demi Moore and Madonna.

This is the deal: There are actually two diet plans for those wishing to lose weight. The first one is called the basic moon diet plan, and it consists of a 24-hour fasting period in which only liquids, such as water and juice, are consumed. According to Moon Connection, a website advocating this diet, the moon affects the water in your body, therefore the timing of your fast is very important and must occur exactly-at the very second-when the new moon or full moon occurs. Also per this site, you could lose up to 6 pounds in one 24-hour period. Since you would only be fasting once a month, really no harm done. You would lose water weight but then probably gain it back immediately. [Tweet this fact!]

The second diet plan is the extended moon diet plan. In this version, all phases of the moon are covered: full moon, waning moon, waxing moon, and new moon. During the full and new moon phase, 24-hour fasting is encouraged same as the basic plan. During the waning moon period, one can consume solid foods, but with around eight glasses of water a day to "encourage detoxification." Then during the waxing moon, you eat "less than usual" without starving yourself and are advised not to eat after 6 p.m., when "the moon&aposs light becomes more visible." With this plan you would be fasting more and therefore putting yourself at risk for side effects such as fatigue, irritability, and dizziness, in addition to impinging greatly on your social life. (Not eating after 6? I don&apost think that would work for most.)

I have many problems with this diet, but the main issue is there is no conclusive scientific evidence that supports the claim that our bodies need a detox program or cleanse. We have kidneys, which naturally remove waste from our bodies 24 hours a day, 7 days a week without the need for a liquid fast. And furthermore, I couldn&apost find any research to support the relationship between the lunar calendar and our body water.

To me, this is just another fad diet that restricts calories. Any weight loss would most likely be temporary due to difficulty sticking with this plan, as well as the fact that any pounds lost are likely water weight, which is quickly regained when you return to normal eating. Let&aposs leave this diet to the celebrities-or better yet, the werewolfs. The rest of should know better.

What do you think of the Werewolf Diet? Tweet us @Shape_Magazine and @kerigans.


Forget Cavemen, Now Everyone's Eating Like a Werewolf

Just when I thought I have heard it all, another diet appears on my radar. This time it&aposs the werewolf diet, also know as the lunar diet. And of course it has become popular because supposedly there are celebrities who are following it, including Demi Moore and Madonna.

This is the deal: There are actually two diet plans for those wishing to lose weight. The first one is called the basic moon diet plan, and it consists of a 24-hour fasting period in which only liquids, such as water and juice, are consumed. According to Moon Connection, a website advocating this diet, the moon affects the water in your body, therefore the timing of your fast is very important and must occur exactly-at the very second-when the new moon or full moon occurs. Also per this site, you could lose up to 6 pounds in one 24-hour period. Since you would only be fasting once a month, really no harm done. You would lose water weight but then probably gain it back immediately. [Tweet this fact!]

The second diet plan is the extended moon diet plan. In this version, all phases of the moon are covered: full moon, waning moon, waxing moon, and new moon. During the full and new moon phase, 24-hour fasting is encouraged same as the basic plan. During the waning moon period, one can consume solid foods, but with around eight glasses of water a day to "encourage detoxification." Then during the waxing moon, you eat "less than usual" without starving yourself and are advised not to eat after 6 p.m., when "the moon&aposs light becomes more visible." With this plan you would be fasting more and therefore putting yourself at risk for side effects such as fatigue, irritability, and dizziness, in addition to impinging greatly on your social life. (Not eating after 6? I don&apost think that would work for most.)

I have many problems with this diet, but the main issue is there is no conclusive scientific evidence that supports the claim that our bodies need a detox program or cleanse. We have kidneys, which naturally remove waste from our bodies 24 hours a day, 7 days a week without the need for a liquid fast. And furthermore, I couldn&apost find any research to support the relationship between the lunar calendar and our body water.

To me, this is just another fad diet that restricts calories. Any weight loss would most likely be temporary due to difficulty sticking with this plan, as well as the fact that any pounds lost are likely water weight, which is quickly regained when you return to normal eating. Let&aposs leave this diet to the celebrities-or better yet, the werewolfs. The rest of should know better.

What do you think of the Werewolf Diet? Tweet us @Shape_Magazine and @kerigans.


Watch the video: Werewolves. Super Blood Wolf Moon - Legends u0026 Folklore #2. Myth Stories (July 2022).


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