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New Study Links Sugary Drinks to ‘Deep’ Fat

New Study Links Sugary Drinks to ‘Deep’ Fat



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A new study found that sugary beverages might be to blame for stubborn fat that won’t seem to go away. It is also associated with diabetes and heart disease.

1,003 middle-aged participants, 45 percent women and with a mean age of 45.3 years, were examined over a six-year period. Participants were categorized into four groups based on how many sugar-sweetened beverages they consumed on a regular basis: less than one serving per month, or non-consumers, one serving a month to less than one serving per week, one serving per week to one serving per day, and greater than one serving per day, or daily consumers.

Participants underwent computer tomography scans at the beginning and end of the study in order for researchers to accurately measure changes in visceral fat. Results from the study found that those who drank more sugar-sweetened beverages tended to have more visceral fat. Participants who never drank sugar-sweetened beverages or only drank them occasionally gained the least amount of body fat, on average of 40 cubic inches. In comparison, daily drinkers gained the most visceral fat, 52 cubic inches on average.

Researchers noted that overall, consumers of sugary drinks were predominantly male, younger, smokers, engaged in slightly more physical activity, and less likely to have diabetes. Though no association was found between diet soda and visceral fat increase, drinkers in this category were less likely to be engaged in physical activity, had higher BMIs, and a higher prevalence of diabetes in comparison to nondrinkers.

Dr. Caroline Fox, leader author of the study, says, “Our message to consumers is to follow the current dietary guidelines and to be mindful of how much sugar-sweetened beverages they drink.”


Not Sweet Nothings: Why Splenda and Stevia Can Make You Gain Weight

Editor’s Note: Four years after the release of his New York Times best-seller How Not to Die, nutritionfacts.org founder Michael Greger, MD, brings us How Not to Diet: The Groundbreaking Science of Healthy, Permanent Weight Loss . In this comprehensive work, Greger arms readers with a deep understanding of the science of weight loss, dispelling myriad myths and misconceptions along the way. The following excerpt examines the impact of artificial sweeteners.

On April Fools’ Day 1998, the FDA announced its approval of the artificial sweetener sucralose,1611 sold as Splenda, a.k.a. 1,6-dichloro-1,6-dideoxy-β-D-fructofuranosyl-4-chloro-4-deoxy-α-D-galactopyranoside. Despite its scary-sounding chemical name, the worst thing about it seemed to be that it was a rare migraine trigger in susceptible individuals, to which the manufacturer of sucralose responded that you have to weigh whatever risk there may be against the “broader benefits,” such as “helping to mitigate the health risks associated with the national epidemic of obesity.”


Not Sweet Nothings: Why Splenda and Stevia Can Make You Gain Weight

Editor’s Note: Four years after the release of his New York Times best-seller How Not to Die, nutritionfacts.org founder Michael Greger, MD, brings us How Not to Diet: The Groundbreaking Science of Healthy, Permanent Weight Loss . In this comprehensive work, Greger arms readers with a deep understanding of the science of weight loss, dispelling myriad myths and misconceptions along the way. The following excerpt examines the impact of artificial sweeteners.

On April Fools’ Day 1998, the FDA announced its approval of the artificial sweetener sucralose,1611 sold as Splenda, a.k.a. 1,6-dichloro-1,6-dideoxy-β-D-fructofuranosyl-4-chloro-4-deoxy-α-D-galactopyranoside. Despite its scary-sounding chemical name, the worst thing about it seemed to be that it was a rare migraine trigger in susceptible individuals, to which the manufacturer of sucralose responded that you have to weigh whatever risk there may be against the “broader benefits,” such as “helping to mitigate the health risks associated with the national epidemic of obesity.”


Not Sweet Nothings: Why Splenda and Stevia Can Make You Gain Weight

Editor’s Note: Four years after the release of his New York Times best-seller How Not to Die, nutritionfacts.org founder Michael Greger, MD, brings us How Not to Diet: The Groundbreaking Science of Healthy, Permanent Weight Loss . In this comprehensive work, Greger arms readers with a deep understanding of the science of weight loss, dispelling myriad myths and misconceptions along the way. The following excerpt examines the impact of artificial sweeteners.

On April Fools’ Day 1998, the FDA announced its approval of the artificial sweetener sucralose,1611 sold as Splenda, a.k.a. 1,6-dichloro-1,6-dideoxy-β-D-fructofuranosyl-4-chloro-4-deoxy-α-D-galactopyranoside. Despite its scary-sounding chemical name, the worst thing about it seemed to be that it was a rare migraine trigger in susceptible individuals, to which the manufacturer of sucralose responded that you have to weigh whatever risk there may be against the “broader benefits,” such as “helping to mitigate the health risks associated with the national epidemic of obesity.”


Not Sweet Nothings: Why Splenda and Stevia Can Make You Gain Weight

Editor’s Note: Four years after the release of his New York Times best-seller How Not to Die, nutritionfacts.org founder Michael Greger, MD, brings us How Not to Diet: The Groundbreaking Science of Healthy, Permanent Weight Loss . In this comprehensive work, Greger arms readers with a deep understanding of the science of weight loss, dispelling myriad myths and misconceptions along the way. The following excerpt examines the impact of artificial sweeteners.

On April Fools’ Day 1998, the FDA announced its approval of the artificial sweetener sucralose,1611 sold as Splenda, a.k.a. 1,6-dichloro-1,6-dideoxy-β-D-fructofuranosyl-4-chloro-4-deoxy-α-D-galactopyranoside. Despite its scary-sounding chemical name, the worst thing about it seemed to be that it was a rare migraine trigger in susceptible individuals, to which the manufacturer of sucralose responded that you have to weigh whatever risk there may be against the “broader benefits,” such as “helping to mitigate the health risks associated with the national epidemic of obesity.”


Not Sweet Nothings: Why Splenda and Stevia Can Make You Gain Weight

Editor’s Note: Four years after the release of his New York Times best-seller How Not to Die, nutritionfacts.org founder Michael Greger, MD, brings us How Not to Diet: The Groundbreaking Science of Healthy, Permanent Weight Loss . In this comprehensive work, Greger arms readers with a deep understanding of the science of weight loss, dispelling myriad myths and misconceptions along the way. The following excerpt examines the impact of artificial sweeteners.

On April Fools’ Day 1998, the FDA announced its approval of the artificial sweetener sucralose,1611 sold as Splenda, a.k.a. 1,6-dichloro-1,6-dideoxy-β-D-fructofuranosyl-4-chloro-4-deoxy-α-D-galactopyranoside. Despite its scary-sounding chemical name, the worst thing about it seemed to be that it was a rare migraine trigger in susceptible individuals, to which the manufacturer of sucralose responded that you have to weigh whatever risk there may be against the “broader benefits,” such as “helping to mitigate the health risks associated with the national epidemic of obesity.”


Not Sweet Nothings: Why Splenda and Stevia Can Make You Gain Weight

Editor’s Note: Four years after the release of his New York Times best-seller How Not to Die, nutritionfacts.org founder Michael Greger, MD, brings us How Not to Diet: The Groundbreaking Science of Healthy, Permanent Weight Loss . In this comprehensive work, Greger arms readers with a deep understanding of the science of weight loss, dispelling myriad myths and misconceptions along the way. The following excerpt examines the impact of artificial sweeteners.

On April Fools’ Day 1998, the FDA announced its approval of the artificial sweetener sucralose,1611 sold as Splenda, a.k.a. 1,6-dichloro-1,6-dideoxy-β-D-fructofuranosyl-4-chloro-4-deoxy-α-D-galactopyranoside. Despite its scary-sounding chemical name, the worst thing about it seemed to be that it was a rare migraine trigger in susceptible individuals, to which the manufacturer of sucralose responded that you have to weigh whatever risk there may be against the “broader benefits,” such as “helping to mitigate the health risks associated with the national epidemic of obesity.”


Not Sweet Nothings: Why Splenda and Stevia Can Make You Gain Weight

Editor’s Note: Four years after the release of his New York Times best-seller How Not to Die, nutritionfacts.org founder Michael Greger, MD, brings us How Not to Diet: The Groundbreaking Science of Healthy, Permanent Weight Loss . In this comprehensive work, Greger arms readers with a deep understanding of the science of weight loss, dispelling myriad myths and misconceptions along the way. The following excerpt examines the impact of artificial sweeteners.

On April Fools’ Day 1998, the FDA announced its approval of the artificial sweetener sucralose,1611 sold as Splenda, a.k.a. 1,6-dichloro-1,6-dideoxy-β-D-fructofuranosyl-4-chloro-4-deoxy-α-D-galactopyranoside. Despite its scary-sounding chemical name, the worst thing about it seemed to be that it was a rare migraine trigger in susceptible individuals, to which the manufacturer of sucralose responded that you have to weigh whatever risk there may be against the “broader benefits,” such as “helping to mitigate the health risks associated with the national epidemic of obesity.”


Not Sweet Nothings: Why Splenda and Stevia Can Make You Gain Weight

Editor’s Note: Four years after the release of his New York Times best-seller How Not to Die, nutritionfacts.org founder Michael Greger, MD, brings us How Not to Diet: The Groundbreaking Science of Healthy, Permanent Weight Loss . In this comprehensive work, Greger arms readers with a deep understanding of the science of weight loss, dispelling myriad myths and misconceptions along the way. The following excerpt examines the impact of artificial sweeteners.

On April Fools’ Day 1998, the FDA announced its approval of the artificial sweetener sucralose,1611 sold as Splenda, a.k.a. 1,6-dichloro-1,6-dideoxy-β-D-fructofuranosyl-4-chloro-4-deoxy-α-D-galactopyranoside. Despite its scary-sounding chemical name, the worst thing about it seemed to be that it was a rare migraine trigger in susceptible individuals, to which the manufacturer of sucralose responded that you have to weigh whatever risk there may be against the “broader benefits,” such as “helping to mitigate the health risks associated with the national epidemic of obesity.”


Not Sweet Nothings: Why Splenda and Stevia Can Make You Gain Weight

Editor’s Note: Four years after the release of his New York Times best-seller How Not to Die, nutritionfacts.org founder Michael Greger, MD, brings us How Not to Diet: The Groundbreaking Science of Healthy, Permanent Weight Loss . In this comprehensive work, Greger arms readers with a deep understanding of the science of weight loss, dispelling myriad myths and misconceptions along the way. The following excerpt examines the impact of artificial sweeteners.

On April Fools’ Day 1998, the FDA announced its approval of the artificial sweetener sucralose,1611 sold as Splenda, a.k.a. 1,6-dichloro-1,6-dideoxy-β-D-fructofuranosyl-4-chloro-4-deoxy-α-D-galactopyranoside. Despite its scary-sounding chemical name, the worst thing about it seemed to be that it was a rare migraine trigger in susceptible individuals, to which the manufacturer of sucralose responded that you have to weigh whatever risk there may be against the “broader benefits,” such as “helping to mitigate the health risks associated with the national epidemic of obesity.”


Not Sweet Nothings: Why Splenda and Stevia Can Make You Gain Weight

Editor’s Note: Four years after the release of his New York Times best-seller How Not to Die, nutritionfacts.org founder Michael Greger, MD, brings us How Not to Diet: The Groundbreaking Science of Healthy, Permanent Weight Loss . In this comprehensive work, Greger arms readers with a deep understanding of the science of weight loss, dispelling myriad myths and misconceptions along the way. The following excerpt examines the impact of artificial sweeteners.

On April Fools’ Day 1998, the FDA announced its approval of the artificial sweetener sucralose,1611 sold as Splenda, a.k.a. 1,6-dichloro-1,6-dideoxy-β-D-fructofuranosyl-4-chloro-4-deoxy-α-D-galactopyranoside. Despite its scary-sounding chemical name, the worst thing about it seemed to be that it was a rare migraine trigger in susceptible individuals, to which the manufacturer of sucralose responded that you have to weigh whatever risk there may be against the “broader benefits,” such as “helping to mitigate the health risks associated with the national epidemic of obesity.”